Railway Museum, Maliebaanstation 16 26 Jul 2019 Special Event 18:30 - 20:00

Doors open 18:00. Reception occurs before the performance and talk.

As the History of Science Society, which is based in America, holds its annual meeting in Utrecht, one of the key academic centers on the European continent, one may surmise that the field has returned home. Yet, this hardly reflects how today's world of scholarship is constituted: in the historiography of science, "provincializing Europe" has become an important theme, while the field itself, as is the case across the world of academia, is centered around a predominantly American literature. At the same time, ever since historians of science have emancipated themselves from the sciences a long time ago, they often have appeared, in the public eye, to question rather than to seek to bolster the authority of the sciences. How has this situation come about, and what does it tell us about the world we live in today? What insight is sought and what public benefit is gained by the historical study of science? As we try to answer these questions, we will follow a number of key mid-twentieth century historians in their Atlantic crossings. Their answers to debates on the constitution of the early modern 'scientific revolution' or the novelty of the work of Albert Einstein will illustrate how notions of 'center' and 'periphery' have shifted-and what that may tell us about being 'in Europe' today. Jeroen van Dongen is Professor of History of Science at the University of Amsterdam. He studies black holes, Einstein, and themes that cut across science in its Cold war contexts and general questions of how to conduct historiography. He has taught and researched at Utrecht University, the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, and the Einstein Papers Project at Caltech.

The lecture is being supported by the Elizabeth Paris Endowment for Socially Engaged History and Philosophy of Science. The Endowment honors the life of Elizabeth Paris, a scholar who was committed to integrating the intellectual side of the history of science with its social, institutional, and policy aspects. Learn more about Elizabeth Paris.



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About the Venue

When you visit the Railway Museum, you enter in the Maliebaanstation, built in 1874. This Utrecht station has been restored to its former glory. When you come in, you feel as if you're the first traveler at a Station in history. Get ready to go on a journey through time!

You can enjoy the most beautiful trains from the Dutch railway history. You can see and experience how trains have developed over the years. From ancient steam locomotives and wooden carriages to advanced electric trains.

In between the trains you can have a drink and even the opportunity to go and walk around between the Trains.


A Musical Story of Time ♬
19:00 - 19:15
We struggle with time! Popular lines like: “do things in your own time”, “time heals all wounds”, “live in the here and now”, suggest that time is important to the way we live our lives in the 21st century. Simultaneously, these wisdoms have a history. Without knowledge of this past such statements turn into empty and meaningless clichés, not applicable in life and not usable in debate. Therefore: we have to knów what time does to us and, vice versa, what we do to time. Susanna Bloem’s project, entitled ‘Time and person, now?!’, aims to uncover ideas about time-experience from the modern history of psychiatry and does that via research ánd composition. After all: there is no better way to start talking about the meaning of time than via an experience of time through music. Since music can make time concrete. Tonight she will play and talk about her first piece “Human time”: Which treats “Inner life history” a psychiatric concept of the first half of the 20th century. She invites you to listen along and investigate with her how music can help to describe past ideas about the psychic forms, possibilities and limitations time can take. And this way inform the question: What is the relationship between time-experience and a meaningful life?
In Europe
19:15 - 20:15
Presented by : Jeroen van Dongen
As the American History of Science Society holds its annual meeting in Utrecht, one of the key academic centers on the European continent, one may surmise that the field has returned home. Yet, this hardly reflects how today’s world of scholarship is constituted: in the historiography of science, “provincializing Europe” has become an important theme, while the field itself, as is the case across the world of academia, is centered around a predominantly American literature. At the same time, ever since historians of science have emancipated themselves from the sciences a long time ago, they often have appeared, in the public eye, to question rather than to seek to bolster the authority of the sciences. How has this situation come about, and what does it tell us about the world we live in today? What insight is sought and what public benefit is gained by the historical study of science? As we try to answer these questions, we will follow a number of key mid-twentieth century historians in their Atlantic crossings. Their answers to debates on the constitution of the early modern ‘scientific revolution’ or the novelty of the work of Albert Einstein will illustrate how notions of ‘center’ and ‘periphery’ have shifted—and what that may tell us about being ‘in Europe’ today. Jeroen van Dongen is Professor of History of Science at the University of Amsterdam. He studies black holes, Einstein, and themes that cut across science in its Cold war contexts and general questions of how to conduct historiography. He has taught and researched at Utrecht University, the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, and the Einstein Papers Project at Caltech.

Speakers
Utrecht University
Moderators
Descartes Centre, Utrecht University
Attendees
Stanford University
University of Turku
Graduate Student HPS, Utrecht University
History of Science Society

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