Add to my Schedule Janskerk, Janskerkhof 26 23 Jul 2019 Special Event
Tools for Historians of Science 18:00 - 19:30
20190723T1800 20190723T1930 Europe/Amsterdam Plenary Session As historians of science, we are all somehow engaged – whether it’s with our research, our teaching, the dynamics of our field, or thinking about how our expertise might be brought to bear on the ... Janskerk, Janskerkhof 26 History of Science Society 2019 meeting@hssonline.org

As historians of science, we are all somehow engaged – whether it’s with our research, our teaching, the dynamics of our field, or thinking about how our expertise might be brought to bear on the myriad of challenges facing our world today. This year’s plenary session explores what it currently means to be an engaged historian of science with an eye toward inviting further conversation with our audience and within the history of science community more broadly. The session will feature a small number of young colleagues whose research and related activities exemplify creative forms of engagement both within and beyond our discipline. This will be followed by a presentation by Sheila Jasanoff, in which she draws on her broad and deep expertise to reflect on how engaged scholarship deepens our understanding of the roles of science in society and of society in science.We are grateful to be able to commence the HSS 2019 Meeting in The Janserk--an icon of Utrecht. 

The Janskerk was built in the middle of the 11th century as a collegiate church. The client was bishop Bernold, who was also the founder of the Utrecht Pieterskerk. It is therefore not surprising that the two churches originally looked very similar. Just like the Pieterskerk, the Janskerk became a Romanesque columned basilica, built from tuff and equipped with chapels, two towers and the round arch windows characteristic of Romanesque architecture. In both churches the nave was equipped with large pink-red columns, each made from one piece of sandstone, and in both churches there was a crypt.

In contrast to that of the Pieterskerk, which is still accessible, that of the Janskerk was closed at the end of the 13th century. Another important change was the conversion of the columns to pillars. The columns were not strong enough to support the weight of the church and therefore they were reinforced. One of the pillars has now been partially opened, so that the original pink-red column is visible again. A column is also arranged in its entirety in the left-hand side aisle. In contrast to the nave and the side aisles, where the wallwork is mostly 11th century, the choir and the chapels have undergone a major change since the construction period. They were rebuilt in the Gothic style in the period 1508-1539.

In a nutshell: the use of the church then and now. From its construction in the 11th century until 1580, the Janskerk served for centuries as a Catholic collegiate church. After the city authorities had banned Catholicism, the church was used as a reformed church and it was given other functions. For example, a library was established in the choir in 1584 and in 1813, during the last year of the French occupation, the church was briefly used as a barrack.

Since 1947 a student pastor came to the Janskerk. This resulted in the Evangelical University Municipality (EUG), nowadays called the EUG Ecumenical Student Municipality. In addition to the weekly service on Sundays, the Janskerk is rented out for all kinds of different events, such as concerts, congresses and weddings.

 

Organized by Lissa Roberts



Speakers
Max Planck Institute for History of Science
Stanford University
Moderators
University of Twente

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